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lessons from the last storm. >> reporter: connecticut is one of 13 states haunted by last year's irene, and the nearly 16 billion in damage, leaving thousands without power for days. then hit by a surprising snowstorm on halloween. today, governor malloy warned it could be the type of storm not seen in 30 years. >> have enough food and water for everyone in your household. assume there will be an elongated period of time in which you will be without energy. >> reporter: at the massachusetts store? power supplies were hot items. >> i have generators, make sure we have oil, flash lights, got to be prepared. >> reporter: storm surge is another worry, with a full moon, sunday night being a difficult combination, it sent the area in norfolk, virginia, out to sea. others sought safe harbor. and along the new jersey shore, these people sought safe harbor >> i may as well take the right steps, get the boat out of the way. whatever is going to happen will happen >> reporter: this boat yard couldn't keep up with requests. >> no, i'm sorry, we can't take boats out of the water. >> reporter: they'
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the ele
. but people are taking preparations. and perhaps because of this, victor. when irene came through, irene was more of a direct hit in this area. in fact, there's a coastal road that runs along here, highway 12, a good part of that was washed out. they're not expecting quite a direct hit with this particular storm, but again, they are talking about the wind, the rain and power outages. and victor, that's really what people are bracing for as the storm gets to us. >> i'm wondering, george, i saw an analyst yesterday saying this is going to be a lot worse than irene. are people sticking around for it, or are they boarding up and getting out of town? >> reporter: you know, when you walk around, when you take a look at how people are preparing for this storm, everyone's keeping a very close eye on us, as we report what's happening. they're watching the track of the storm system. right now it looks like it will move in a little further north than where we are. but we will feel the first brunt of the storm. we will see a lot of the winds that come through, the winds that could get up 40, 50 mile
be worse than irene, because this storm will hold its strength, back off as usual, and then feed into the winter storm. this is why it's unusual, because everybody is going to be watching it. it is going to look like it is going to go out to sea and then it looks like it will be pulled back towards the west. >> bill: irene was the one where there was so much flooding in the northeast. >> yes, this is going to be flooding rains very strong winds, and with the right angle for place like chesapeake bay, the south shores of long island and even into new york city if it comes in at the right angle. and it could be a worse-case scenario for some of those places. >> bill: i think maryland is probably drawn -- >> yes. >> i have a very important question, wednesday is halloween, and i have two kids at home that are going to freak out -- if they go out. what is going to happen on halloween. >> it will be a weakening storm, but still strong high pressure gusty winds, with the snow starts to fly higherel indications in parts of west virginia and parts of ohio and penn
of the season. with memories of hurricane irene fresh on everyone's minds, hurricane companies are bracing for the worst. >> getting our resources ready, making sure the people are ready, getting everything in order. >> reporter: in maryland, batteries, radiators, and generators flew off the shelves. >> talking five or six days possibility, therefore, you got to set a plan for that. >> reporter: planning that could save lives. hurricane sandy is blamed for 21 deaths across the caribbean. in cuba, nine people were killed as sandy toppled houses, ripped off roofs, and flooded neighborhoods. in the dominican republic, flash flooding buried cars and trees under water. and in jamaica, most of the eastern part of the island remains without power, and even now, flash flooding remains a danger. >> right now, that area right there. >> reporter: now faced with news of sandy's destructive potential, those living in her path can only do their best as they prepare for the worst. >> last week we talked about the fact we hadn't had any hurricanes this year, and here we are. >> reporter: the storm surge
. when you thing we had hurricane irene last year and it was around $4 billion storm, this certainly has all the potential ability to be about that strong, if not worse than we were doling the right now this is the storm at 105 miles per hour sustained wind, not that pretty on the satellite image, but we will continue to watch it pull to the north. we are already feeling the impact across florida and we have tropical storm warnings in affect. we will talk tomorrow into saturday morning with winds around 40 to 50 miles per hour. these are like pictures from miami and you can see certainly the rough surf which will continue. we will see 3" to 5" of rain and wind all day tomorrow at 30 to 50 miles per hour but wednesday you get beyond florida we will start to see things becoming much more concerning, the track of the storm right now continuing to bring up to new jersey or new york and possibly cape cod, but in the center of that is what we are talking about. the first part of the storm between now and saturday morning, we are talking about tropical storm force conditions look the coast, ver
's the widest, as you alluded to at the top-- top, it's the widest hurricane we've seen. hurricane irene came last august. she came knocking on the door and no one was listening. hurricane sandy is in the house and neither presidential candidate can walk away from what is happening. we've got to begin to plan for what's ahead. the reaction is that it's over. milk is spilt. the climate is changing rapidly. we've got a super storm that is right in front of us. we've got the hurricane coming in off the atlantic. it's met up with a nor'easter, and then to flow this thing into epic proportion, we're missing 1.35 million square miles of ice in the arctic. so all the heat in the arctic ocean is thrown up into the atmosphere and the jet stream, as it loops south as far south as well into this hurricane and we've got ourselves a super storm. hello. it's time to get into it. >> cenk: dr. halter, let me read you a quote from rutgers situation. she writes, the situation is consistent with what i would expect to see more often as a result of unabated warming especially the amplification of the warming in
had during hurricane irene about flooding in lower manhattan and damage on long island jersey shore come in to play. farther north talking about new england. in any case effects over the entire northeast part of the u.s. this is going to be just a high-profile, high-threat event, it looks like that we're talking about well into next week. and we really need to be paying close attention, because this is unprecedented, as best we can tell. >> bryan norcross, not such good news. very worrying. thanks for your expertise. >>> democrats seizing the opportunity to try to link mitt romney to richard mourdock's comments about rape and abortion in the indiana race. republicans insist what women care about most is the economy. >> what he said was crazy, but having said that, this election for president is not about that. >> joining me now is washington senator, washington senator patty murray, who of course chairs the democratic senatorial campaign committee. your job in this election is to make sure that democrats get re-elected and you don't lose control of the senate. richard mourdock could
, connecticut, long island, new jersey, than irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a new york city police officer accused of plotting to kidnap, rape, kill, cook and cannibalize as many as 100 women is being held without bail. the 28-year-old officer is accused of illegally accessing a national crime database to locate potential targets. he did not enter a plea in court today. >>> lee boyd malveaux told the "today" show he was sexually abused by john alan mohammed, the master will did mind mind o attacks that terrorized the washington area in 2002, saying he knew it was wrong but didn't have the willpower to say no. he was 17 at the time of the attacks and he was 15 when his acco
irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a late breaking story. a top romney surrogate tonight 50 tributing colin powell's endorsement of president obama to race. here is what john sununu said moments ago on "piers morgan tonight." >> frankly, when you take a look at colin powell, you have to wonder whether that's an endorsement based on issues or whether he has a slightly different reason for preferring president obama. >> what reason would that be? >> well, when you have somebody of your own race that you're proud of for being of your own race, i applaud colin powell for doing so. >>> there wasn't enough real time information to determine exactly what was happening in benghazi, l
, irene didn't do too much to new york city. but it certainly did a lot to vermont. and will this storm do something similar as it's stalling. here all the models bringing it up from the city down to about washington, d.c. but the big thing is it stops, it stops moving for 48 hours and it could rain for two days and make flooding. if it rains a half an inch an hour for 48 hours, that's two feet of rain in any one spot. that is going to cause significant flash flooding and the potential for big loss of life. >> chad, thanks for the update. we may well come back to you before the end of the show. appreciate it. >>> let's get back to politics and the subject of race. outspoken conservative ann coulter has a lot to say about just about everything, in fact. the new subject of her new book is "mugged, racial demagoguery" dedicated to quote, the freest black man in america. we'll discover who that is. ann coulter, welcome back. >> thank you. good to be here. >> i know you have been struggling with a bit of a cold. >> you have an unfair advantage about it tonight. >> you have been whining about it
. we look at the video from where irene hit this area last year. you can see that the sand mounds and the seawalls that are intended to be the front line of defense for a storm, they were no match for the heavy rains and winds. water just poured right in. as a result, there was massive flooding, mandatory evacuations. and people in this area, once again, bracing, preparing themselves for the worst. sam? >> thank you, linsey. thank you, ginger. if you've seen the spaghetti models, they're turning this thing towards the coastline. a lot of terms are out there. atmospheric bomb. superstorm. at the same time, joking terms like frankenstorm are used. we turn to one of my good friends, expert senior meteorologist bernie rayno from accuweather. when you hear the terms, how much of it is hype on this storm? and how much is very real? >> when you've been in this field as long as you and i have been, sam, you look for a way out when you see a storm that's projected to be this strong. but unfortunately, i don't believe there is a way out. this is not being overhyped. i would use the terms de
, would be more dangerous than even irene from last year. it turned out to be a huge flood problem for virginia, vermont and new jersey. i know it's late in the season, but the water is still warm enough to make this storm generate. it went -- i was watch it last night in bed on my -- i was tweeting from 8:00 until 12:00, and this thing went from an 80-mile-per-hour storm to about a 115 as it left jamaica and slammed into cuba, and that was only in five hours. there's a lot of potential. >> is it true that a late storm as well could be a lot deadlier, a lot more dangerous late in the season? >> i would say an earlier storm, october 10th, that peak day with the waters the warmest would be the most concerning, but i think people probably take it less serious. oh, come on, it's november. it can't happen. there's not going to be anything bad. if you let your guard down and think that it's out of season, you're wrong. look at the waves there. is that miami? somewhere. look at that. the way it's crashing on. that's why you can't even be on the sea wall. you need to be behind it and in th
irene of last year. >> okay. we'll talk about it for a little while. thank you very much. >>> now back to politics. forget ohio and florida for a second here. the campaigns turning to virginia which president obama turned blue last go around but this time there are cracks in his support. john king talks with voters on the ground amid a dead heat in the polls. rees all laugh when you walk by ♪ ♪ and the neighbors' kids... what does being true to yourself have to do with being healthy? everything. ♪ but you're not ♪ you're the one ♪ one, one, one, one, one ♪ the one ♪ one, one, one, one, one ♪ the one ♪ one, one, one... email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >>> virginia will be inundated with presidential campaign stops really between now and sunday. president obama and paul ryan today. joe
and inland, once it gets inland, this is not just a coastal event and as you remember tropical storm irene caused more damage inland than it did along the coast. this system could dump up it a foot of snow, parts of west virginia, ohio on into pennsylvania. andrea, this one is going to be a massive, massive problem probably for days to come. >> all right, al. thank you. stay safe. dylan dryer will be here with the rest of the nation's forecast in just a few minutes. here's lester. >> all right. hurricane sandy is already impacting the race for the white house. mitt romney and vice president joe biden each canceled planned weekend appearances in virginia. ron mott is in ohio and he's traveling with vice presidential candidate paul ryan. ron, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. as we all know it takes 270 electoral votes to win the white house. 18 votes are up for grabs in ohio and they just may be the most important votes of all. >> hello, nevada! >> reporter: along with the weather churning over the atlantic, president obama and governor mitt romney are whipping up a storm of t
. just like tropical storm irene did last year. the difference is, this is drawing in a lot of cold air from canada. it could produce up to a foot of snow in parts of west virginia, ohio, and pennsylvania. so we're talking about not only a tropical system with tons of rain and flooding and massive power outages but snow as well. the effects of this could be felt for weeks. >> okay, al roker, many thanks for that. >>> our colleagues at the weather channel are following this storm closely as well. we're going have a live report from meteorologist julie martin coming your way at the top of the hour. >>> from there to politics now, ten days to go until the election. today in his weekly address president obama's emphasizing the progress made four years after the wall street crisis. >> our businesses have added more than 5 million new jobs. the unemployment rate has fallen to the lowest level since i took office. home values are ride rising again and our assembly lines are humming once more. >> mitt romney and paul ryan are looking to gain momentum holding a rally last night in canton. >> i w
irene. the strongest winds may be 100 to 150 miles north. southern jersey, delaware, maryland, the highest winds maybe up there in connecticut and new york city. it's a big, broad storm. that's the most important thing. and if you're north of that center, we have big issues and big concerns with storm surge and coastal flooding. that will probably be the epic ending to this storm. that's probably what everyone will remember is what happens to the beaches in new jersey, possibly connecticut, rhode island and long island if the storm does come ashore down there in southern jersey. all of these little lines are possible paths. we still haven't ruled out a direct impact into areas of new england either. there's still some questions to be answered. the bottom line is starting on sunday afternoon and evening, mid-atlantic and northeast, it's too late to prepare. you have today, you have tomorrow and then be prepared to stay in your house with your family and kids. most of monday and maybe even into tuesday. i'll have updates throughout the show here. stay tuned. new york city, sunri
are open as of now. expectations are almost 12 foot storm surge. irene at 9 in comparison just to give you an idea of what we're looking at here. we're also starting to see some twitter pictures come in of the main fishing pier in ocean city, maryland being washed away. pictures of atlantic city underwater. it is a little tricky for us to put emphasis on campaign developments knowing what's to come weatherwise and that obviously is of the utmost concern especially in people safety but we do only have eight days left. that means weighing the impact on everything from early voting of course now to access and power to the polling places on election day itself. it is harder to get out the vote door knocking when people can't get out and about. the millions of dollars that conservatives have saved up to bombard the airways in the homestretch may be waste if the no one can watch tv. and even the news itself is going to be all storm all the time at least until the worst seemed to have past. it will change the nature of th
gearing up for what could be the storm of the season. with with memories of last year's hurricane irene still fresh on everyone's mind, utility companies as far north as connecticut are bracing for the worst. >> getting our resources ready, making sure the people are ready, getting everything in order. >> reporter: in maryland, about theorys, generators and radios flew off store shelves. >> you're talking five or six days a possibility, so therefore you've got to set a plan for that. >> reporter: planning that could also save lives. hurricane sandy is now blamed for at least 21 deaths across the caribbean. in cuba, nine people were killed as sandy toppled houses, ripped off roofs and flooded entire neighborhoods, making it the island's most deadly storm since 2005. in the dominican republic, flash flooding buried cars and trees under water. in jamaica, most of the eastern part of the island remains without power. even now, flash flooding remains a danger. >> it's going to get worse. >> right now we're in clear and present danger. >> reporter: sandy's destructive potential, those living
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)

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